35 Fixed Angle (Complete Guide) by phantomD/yuenqi
Please Read

1. This guide is written specifically for armour mobile, but I believe
that it can apply on other mobiles too (By setting the correct F0).

2. The PDF version of this document is available here:
http://www.geocities.com/yuenqe/yuenqi.armour.mobile.35.fixed.angle.pdf

(Try here again if you can't view the PDF:
http://www.geocities.com/yuenqe/download.html )

3. I might not be updating this thread if there is any modification, I
will probably do it on the PDF document.

4. If you would like to use this guide on any public forum please at
least give me a credit.

Introduction

Armour is one of the wicked mobiles in Gunbound. Its disastrous damage
deals on every type of mobile and can probably kill an enemy in two to
three turns. Armour’s SS, besides it’s an eye candy, it is also very
useful compares to Grub’s, Turtle’s, and other mobiles’ SS (Less tricky
and nice digging with splash damage).

Most armour’s users choose to use fixed angle 60, fixed angle 70, 2.4
fixed power, half toss, bjsl and other methods to play. But sometimes,
when you can’t find a high angle (Especially when you are on a flat
land), fixed angle 35 will be one of the best methods for perfect
shooting. (Angle 30 is too low and angle 40 seems too high for me too)

I have been using armour for 3 months, I know 3 months is short, but I
started my research since 3 months ago ‘til now and I’m always
satisfied with the result I can come out with. This 35 fixed angle
method is somewhat like “Knat’s M2’s Shi Liang calculation”, but it’s
not developed based on his method but my experience, time and effort.

“Knat’s M2’s Shi Liang calculation” is a general method for fixed angle
shooting that has oversimplified the wind chart, providing you the
fastest way to determine the power that you need to adjust. I actually
did not expect my formula will come out to be similar with “Knat’s M2’s
Shi Liang calculation”, but since the concept behind is probably the
same, we can’t avoid the occurrence of this coincidence.

Anyway, I can claim that the accuracy of my method is 95% or above,
unless you slip or you calculate distance in the wrong way. Happy
reading.

Distance and Power

Setting shooting point


I know that everyone has his/her own way to set the shooting point, but
this point is the exact starting point of the parabola. Just follow.

Screen distance / Power table [ 1 screen 780px : 20 parts ]

You should know how to split your screen into parts through
observation, don’t ask me. It’s all about experience.

Distance Power
5 1.24 [+0.00]
6 1.36 [+0.12]
7 1.47 [+0.11]
8 1.57 [+0.10]
9 1.66 [+0.09]
10 1.75 [+0.09]
11 1.84 [+0.09]
12 1.92 [+0.08]
13 2.00 [+0.08]
14 2.07 [+0.07]
15 2.15 [+0.08]
16 2.22 [+0.07]
17 2.28 [+0.06]
18 2.35 [+0.07]
19 2.42 [+0.07]
20 2.48 [+0.06]
21 2.54 [+0.06]
22 2.60 [+0.06]
23 2.66 [+0.06]
24 2.72 [+0.06]
25 2.77 [+0.05]
26 2.82 [+0.05]
27 2.88 [+0.06]
28 2.93 [+0.05]
29 2.98 [+0.05]
30 3.03 [+0.05]

Screen distance and power estimation

As you can see, the power to be added for each single part decreases as
distance increases. Try to experience it under 0 wind condition, if you
find any error, just fix it yourself and I don’t need to know.

---- 1/4 ---- 1/2 ---- 3/4 ---- 1 ---- 1.25 ---- 1.5 ---- (Distance)
--- 1.24 --- 1.75 --- 2.15 -- 2.48 -- 2.77 --- 3.03 --- (Power)
------ 0.105 --- 0.08 -- 0.07 --- 0.06 --- 0.05 ------- (Power for each
1/20)

Wind Chart

I know that the wind index is somehow too complex, but please do not
forget this is “35 fixed angle” method that you need a lot of accuracy
on the power. I know that there is a lot of self-developed methods to
deal with complex wind chart, and it’s all about experience. For
instance, rounding up the wind index before you multiply the wind and
adjust certain amount of power on the result you get.

Please also remember when wind is blowing at angle 40 (against-up,
tail-down), you don’t have to adjust the power to compensate with the
wind. This is physic and I don’t have to explain why.

Formula

Power to Adjust

(delta)F’ = F/F0 * (Fw * i) /100

If you pay more attention, you will see that the power needed for ¼
screen shooting is half of the power needed for 1 screen shooting, i.e.
1.24 / 2.48 = 0.5.

Anyway, here are some data that you need, i.e. Distance factor = F/F0

Distance Factor
¼ 0.500
½ 0.706
¾ 0.867
1 (F0) 1.000
1.25 1.169
1.5 1.222

This distance factor is actually the air time value. That’s why you
will be using it in F and F’. Because when an object travels for a
longer air time, more affection the wind will be.

Power to shoot

F’ = F + ?F’

Nothing much to explain here. Just apply the formula by summing wind 0
power with the power for wind compensation.

Where

F = Power under wind 0 condition
F0 = Power for 1 screen under wind 0 condition
(delta)F’ = Power to adjust
F’ = Power to shoot
Fw = Power of Wind
i = Wind index

Example

Target distance = ¼ of 1 full screen
Fw = 24 (Against you)

Solution:

i = 0.96
F = 1.24
(delta)F’ = 0.5 * 24 * 0.96/100 = 11.52/100 ~= 0.12
F’ = 1.24 + 0.12 = 1.36